humansofnewyork:

"I take my meds but I still have bad days. I know the moment I wake up if it’s going to be a bad day. I’m really fidgety and distracted and resentful. I can’t even sit out here on bad days. I get too resentful when people walk by and don’t help. I know it doesn’t make sense, and that I don’t have a right to be resentful, but I still get angry. I can’t keep a job because of the bad days. I just get too verbal when I’m agitated. I don’t even realize I’m doing it. I realize it later. But when it’s happening, I don’t know it’s happening. It’s like when I’m in the picture, I can’t see the picture."

humansofnewyork:

"I take my meds but I still have bad days. I know the moment I wake up if it’s going to be a bad day. I’m really fidgety and distracted and resentful. I can’t even sit out here on bad days. I get too resentful when people walk by and don’t help. I know it doesn’t make sense, and that I don’t have a right to be resentful, but I still get angry. I can’t keep a job because of the bad days. I just get too verbal when I’m agitated. I don’t even realize I’m doing it. I realize it later. But when it’s happening, I don’t know it’s happening. It’s like when I’m in the picture, I can’t see the picture."

perspective insight humans humansofnewyork people life mental illness homelessness kindness

weirdvintage:

Mortado, The Human Fountain was born in Berlin and first exhibited himself there in 1929.  He had holes bored through both his hands and feet, and, when seated in a specially constructed chair, copper tubes were fed through the wounds.   Water flowed through them at a high pressure, making Mortado a “human fountain”.  
When he was not performing, he plugged his wounds with corks to keep them from healing.  He occasionally also performed in biblical Crucifixion reenactments, placing small “blood bags” in his wounds for realism, which his assistant would puncture when he nailed him.  
He is pictured here at Coney Island’s Dreamland Circus in 1930 (Sources 1, 2)

weirdvintage:

Mortado, The Human Fountain was born in Berlin and first exhibited himself there in 1929.  He had holes bored through both his hands and feet, and, when seated in a specially constructed chair, copper tubes were fed through the wounds.   Water flowed through them at a high pressure, making Mortado a “human fountain”.  

When he was not performing, he plugged his wounds with corks to keep them from healing.  He occasionally also performed in biblical Crucifixion reenactments, placing small “blood bags” in his wounds for realism, which his assistant would puncture when he nailed him.  

He is pictured here at Coney Island’s Dreamland Circus in 1930 (Sources 1, 2)

(via weirdvintage)

human fountain humans humanity strange people history crucifixion circus sideshow act coney island weird mortado vintage

 Indonesian regency of Tana Toraja on the island of Sulawesi 
"Tomb Sweeping" Ritual
2014


"Depending on the village, every one to five years, families reunite to exhume the bodies of their deceased relatives, clean up the inside of their coffins, and, if the mummified bodies are in solid enough condition, give their ancestors a fresh change of clothes. "
Marc Ressang, VICE Magazine

(Source: Vice Magazine)

tomb sweeping ritual tana toraja sulawesi indonesia tradition death death rituals vice vice magazine journalism photojournalism humans humanity culture tribes asia religion beliefs customs

Mass Suicide at JonestownGuyanaNovember 18, 1978
In 1978, a group of former Temple members and concerned relatives of current members convinced U.S. Congressman Leo Ryan, a Democrat of California, to travel to Jonestown and investigate the settlement. On November 17, 1978, Ryan arrived in Jonestown with a group of journalists and other observers. At first the visit went well, but the next day, as Ryan’s delegation was about to leave, several Jonestown residents approached the group and asked them for passage out of Guyana. Jones became distressed at the defection of his followers, and one of Jones’ lieutenants attacked Ryan with a knife. The congressman escaped from the incident unharmed, but Jones then ordered Ryan and his companions ambushed and killed at the airstrip as they attempted to leave. The congressman and four others were murdered as they boarded their charter planes.
Back in Jonestown, Jones commanded everyone to gather in the main pavilion and commit what he termed a “revolutionary act.” The youngest members of the Peoples Temple were the first to die, as parents and nurses used syringes to drop a potent mix of cyanide, sedatives and powdered fruit juice into children’s throats. Adults then lined up to drink the poison-laced concoction while armed guards surrounded the pavilion.
When Guyanese officials arrived at the Jonestown compound the next day, they found it carpeted with hundreds of bodies. Many people had perished with their arms around each other. 

Mass Suicide at Jonestown
Guyana
November 18, 1978

In 1978, a group of former Temple members and concerned relatives of current members convinced U.S. Congressman Leo Ryan, a Democrat of California, to travel to Jonestown and investigate the settlement. On November 17, 1978, Ryan arrived in Jonestown with a group of journalists and other observers. At first the visit went well, but the next day, as Ryan’s delegation was about to leave, several Jonestown residents approached the group and asked them for passage out of Guyana. Jones became distressed at the defection of his followers, and one of Jones’ lieutenants attacked Ryan with a knife. The congressman escaped from the incident unharmed, but Jones then ordered Ryan and his companions ambushed and killed at the airstrip as they attempted to leave. The congressman and four others were murdered as they boarded their charter planes.

Back in Jonestown, Jones commanded everyone to gather in the main pavilion and commit what he termed a “revolutionary act.” The youngest members of the Peoples Temple were the first to die, as parents and nurses used syringes to drop a potent mix of cyanide, sedatives and powdered fruit juice into children’s throats. Adults then lined up to drink the poison-laced concoction while armed guards surrounded the pavilion.

When Guyanese officials arrived at the Jonestown compound the next day, they found it carpeted with hundreds of bodies. Many people had perished with their arms around each other. 

jonestown peoples temple leo ryan suicide religion extremists humanity cult religious cult jonestown settlement jim jones brainwashing manipulation tragedy history

"Lonesome George" Posthumous Display 
Pinta Island Giant Tortoise 
American Museum of Natural History : New York City

Arguably the world’s most famous tortoise, Lonesome George was the last known member of his species. It’s believed there were between 14-15 giant tortoise sub-species on the Galapagos where Lonesome George was discovered before human arrival destroyed their food supply of available flora and also resulted in the tortoises being killed to feed ship crews forcing the species to extinction. 

Lonesome George was found in 1971 and lived at the Galapagos Islands center until he died on June 24, 2012 at an age estimated to be over 100 years old. 

animals extinction lonesome george nyc american museum of natural history museums animal rights taxidermy biodiversity humanity human impact tortoises turtles giant tortoise endangered species species galapagos islands pinta island tortoise conservation awareness environment habitat destruction

Joseph Carey Merrick "The Elephant Man"1862-1890"he was found dead in his bed…He was lying on his back as if asleep, and had evidently died suddenly and without struggle. The method of his death was peculiar. So large and heavy was his head that he could not sleep lying down. The attitude he was compelled to assume when he slept was very strange. He sat up in bed with his back supported by pillows, his knees were drawn up, and his arms clasped round his legs, while his head rested on the points of his bent knees. He often said to me that he wished he could lie down to sleep ‘like other people’. I think on this last night he must, with some determination, have made the experiment. The pillow was soft, and the head, when placed on it, must have fallen backwards and caused a dislocation of the neck. Thus it came about that his death was due to the desire that had dominated his life - to be ‘like other people’." - From the diary of Dr. Frederick Treves

Joseph Carey Merrick 
"The Elephant Man"
1862-1890

"he was found dead in his bed…He was lying on his back as if asleep, and had evidently died suddenly and without struggle. The method of his death was peculiar. So large and heavy was his head that he could not sleep lying down. The attitude he was compelled to assume when he slept was very strange. He sat up in bed with his back supported by pillows, his knees were drawn up, and his arms clasped round his legs, while his head rested on the points of his bent knees. He often said to me that he wished he could lie down to sleep ‘like other people’. I think on this last night he must, with some determination, have made the experiment. The pillow was soft, and the head, when placed on it, must have fallen backwards and caused a dislocation of the neck. Thus it came about that his death was due to the desire that had dominated his life - to be ‘like other people’." - From the diary of Dr. Frederick Treves


elephantman humans josephmerrick johnmerrick history science

Benjamin the Tasmanian Tiger(Thylacine)The last known thylacine photographed at Beaumaris Zoo in 1933.The Thylacine became extinct on the Australian mainland not less than 2000 years ago. Its decline and extinction in Tasmania was probably hastened by the introduction of dogs, but appears mainly due to direct human persecution as an alleged pest.

Benjamin the Tasmanian Tiger
(Thylacine)

The last known thylacine photographed at Beaumaris Zoo in 1933.

The Thylacine became extinct on the Australian mainland not less than 2000 years ago. Its decline and extinction in Tasmania was probably hastened by the introduction of dogs, but appears mainly due to direct human persecution as an alleged pest.

tasmaniantiger tasmanianwolf strangeanimals extinct thylacine animals tigers beaumaris zoo australia dogs conservation humans destruction impact overpopulation earth life evolution anthropology habitat destruction alien species biodiversity overexploitation exploitation darwin agriculture deforestation urbanization fragmentation

Lewis Wickes Hine American Sociologist / Photographer1874-1940Hine used his camera as a tool for social reform. His photographs were instrumental in changing the child labor laws in the United States.For nearly ten years Hine was the photographer for the National Child Labor Committee, contributing to exhibitions and the organization’s publication, The Survey. Declaring that he “wanted to show things that had to be corrected,” he was one of the earliest photographers to use the photograph as a documentary tool.

Lewis Wickes Hine
American Sociologist / Photographer
1874-1940

Hine used his camera as a tool for social reform. His photographs were instrumental in changing the child labor laws in the United States.

For nearly ten years Hine was the photographer for the National Child Labor Committee, contributing to exhibitions and the organization’s publication, 
The Survey. Declaring that he “wanted to show things that had to be corrected,” he was one of the earliest photographers to use the photograph as a documentary tool.

Lewis Wickes Hine Photographer photography photojournalist photojournalism black and white photography portraits journalism history life humans sociology america american history cameras social reform social realism united states labor laws child labor national child labor committee documenting change society industrial revolution industrialization activism compulsory education great depression