humansofnewyork:

"I take my meds but I still have bad days. I know the moment I wake up if it’s going to be a bad day. I’m really fidgety and distracted and resentful. I can’t even sit out here on bad days. I get too resentful when people walk by and don’t help. I know it doesn’t make sense, and that I don’t have a right to be resentful, but I still get angry. I can’t keep a job because of the bad days. I just get too verbal when I’m agitated. I don’t even realize I’m doing it. I realize it later. But when it’s happening, I don’t know it’s happening. It’s like when I’m in the picture, I can’t see the picture."

humansofnewyork:

"I take my meds but I still have bad days. I know the moment I wake up if it’s going to be a bad day. I’m really fidgety and distracted and resentful. I can’t even sit out here on bad days. I get too resentful when people walk by and don’t help. I know it doesn’t make sense, and that I don’t have a right to be resentful, but I still get angry. I can’t keep a job because of the bad days. I just get too verbal when I’m agitated. I don’t even realize I’m doing it. I realize it later. But when it’s happening, I don’t know it’s happening. It’s like when I’m in the picture, I can’t see the picture."

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Benjamin the Tasmanian Tiger(Thylacine)The last known thylacine photographed at Beaumaris Zoo in 1933.The Thylacine became extinct on the Australian mainland not less than 2000 years ago. Its decline and extinction in Tasmania was probably hastened by the introduction of dogs, but appears mainly due to direct human persecution as an alleged pest.

Benjamin the Tasmanian Tiger
(Thylacine)

The last known thylacine photographed at Beaumaris Zoo in 1933.

The Thylacine became extinct on the Australian mainland not less than 2000 years ago. Its decline and extinction in Tasmania was probably hastened by the introduction of dogs, but appears mainly due to direct human persecution as an alleged pest.

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Lewis Wickes Hine American Sociologist / Photographer1874-1940Hine used his camera as a tool for social reform. His photographs were instrumental in changing the child labor laws in the United States.For nearly ten years Hine was the photographer for the National Child Labor Committee, contributing to exhibitions and the organization’s publication, The Survey. Declaring that he “wanted to show things that had to be corrected,” he was one of the earliest photographers to use the photograph as a documentary tool.

Lewis Wickes Hine
American Sociologist / Photographer
1874-1940

Hine used his camera as a tool for social reform. His photographs were instrumental in changing the child labor laws in the United States.

For nearly ten years Hine was the photographer for the National Child Labor Committee, contributing to exhibitions and the organization’s publication, 
The Survey. Declaring that he “wanted to show things that had to be corrected,” he was one of the earliest photographers to use the photograph as a documentary tool.

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ZEB BLACKWELL : SOLOPSIST INTERVIEW

Q: Why do you not believe that other people’s minds exist?
A: It’s quite simple, really. I can be quite certain of my own existence – it’s the whole “I think, therefore I am” thing. But as for the existence of other minds, well, that’s a much trickier thing to prove. I can see that there are these funny-looking things that walk around and talk to me and generally do things that would indicate that they have minds like me, but I can’t really be sure. There’s nothing to distinguish my econ professor, for instance, from a robot that could pass the Turing test. Just because people act like they have minds doesn’t mean that they aren’t basically just machines responding to stimuli.

Q: But can’t you look in someone’s eyes when they’re hurting and see that they really feel that pain?
A: Furbies could make some pretty convincing displays of pain. People are just really complex Furbies.

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Denver Butson

A man standing at the bus stop
reading the newspaper is on fire
Flames are peeking out
from beneath his collar and cuffs
His shoes have begun to melt

The woman next to him 
wants to mention it to him
that he is burning
but she is drowning
Water is everywhere
in her mouth and ears
in her eyes
A stream of water runs
steadily from her blouse

Another woman stands at the bus stop
freezing to death
She tries to stand near the man
who is on fire
to try to melt the icicles
that have formed on her eyelashes
and on her nostrils
to stop her teeth long enough
from chattering to say something
to the woman who is drowning
but the woman who is freezing to death
has trouble moving
with blocks of ice on her feet

It takes the three some time
to board the bus
what with the flames
and water and ice
But when they finally climb the stairs 
and take their seats
the driver doesn’t even notice
that none of them has paid
because he is tortured
by visions and is wondering
if the man who got off at the last stop
was really being mauled to death
by wild dogs.

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Epiphanies - Eric Allen Bell

All people operate from the same two motivations: to fulfill their desires and to escape their suffering. Learning this allowed me to finally make sense of how people can hurt each other so badly. The best explanation I had before this was that some people are just bad. What a cop-out. No matter what kind of behavior other people exhibit, they are acting in the most effective way they are capable of (at that moment) to fulfill a desire or to relieve their suffering. These are motives we can all understand; we only vary in method, and the methods each of us has at our disposal depend on our upbringing and our experiences in life, as well as our state of consciousness. Some methods are skillful and helpful to others, others are unskillful and destructive, and almost all destructive behavior is unconscious. So there is no good and evil, only smart and dumb (or wise and foolish.)

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"Human beings are funny. They long to be with the person they love but refuse to admit openly. Some are afraid to show even the slightest sign of affection because of fear. Fear that their feelings may not be recognized, or even worst, returned. But one thing about human beings puzzles me the most is their conscious effort to be connected with the object of their affection even if it kills them slowly within."
- Sigmund Freud 
Father of Psychoanalysis
1856-1939

(Source: cactusbloooom, via duvalsfinest)

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